Monthly Archives: January 2017

Francine Gottfried

Francine Gottfried (born 1947) was a clerical worker in New York City’s Financial District who acquired sudden brief celebrity when, in the space of two weeks in September 1968, increasing numbers of men began watching her as she walked to work. Newspapers dubbed her “Wall Street’s Sweater Girl” as her curvaceous figure seemed to be the sole reason that crowds formed spontaneously around her whenever she appeared in the financial district.

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Cyberchondria

Cyberchondria, otherwise known as ‘compucondria’, the unfounded escalation of concerns about common symptomology based on review of search results and literature online.

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Sokushinbutsu

Sokushinbutsu (即身仏) refers to a practice of Buddhist monks observing austerity to the point of death and entering mummification while alive. This process of self-mummification was mainly practiced in Yamagata in Northern Japan between the 11th and 19th century, by members of the Japanese Vajrayana school of Buddhism called Shingon (“True Word”). The practitioners of sokushinbutsu did not view this practice as an act of suicide, but rather as a form of further enlightenment.

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The Seven Lady Godivas

The Seven Lady Godivas: The True Facts Concerning History’s Barest Family is a picture book of the tale of Lady Godiva, written and illustrated by Dr. Seuss.

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Ferdinand Cheval

“It’s a sandstone shaped by water and hardened by the power of time. It becomes as hard as pebbles. It represents a sculpture so strange that it is impossible for man to imitate, it represents any kind of animal, any kind of caricature.  I said to myself: since Nature is willing to do the sculpture, I will do the masonry and the architecture”

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Ship Of Theseus

The ship of Theseus, also known as Theseus’ paradox, is a thought experiment that raises the question of whether an object that has had all of its components replaced remains fundamentally the same object.

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Signifyin’

Signifyin’ (sometime written “signifyin(g)”) (vernacular), is a form of wordplay. It is a practice in African-American culture involving a verbal strategy of indirection that exploits the gap between the denotative and figurative meanings of words. A simple example would be insulting someone to show affection. Other names for signifyin’ include: “Dropping lugs, joaning, sounding, capping, snapping, dissing, busting, bagging, janking, ranking, toasting, woofing, putting on, or cracking.”

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