Gustave Courbet

He belonged to no school, to no church, to no institution, to no academy, least of all to any régime except the régime of liberty.

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Publication Bias

Publication bias is a type of bias that occurs in published academic research. It occurs when the outcome of an experiment or research study influences the decision whether to publish it.

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Gochi-in no Tajima

Tajima is said to have stood upon the bridge and, spinning his naginata, deflected many if not most of the arrows that came his way.

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Kolmogorov Complexity

In algorithmic information theory the Kolmogorov complexity of an object, such as a piece of text, is the length of the shortest computer program that produces the object as output.

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Jumping Frenchmen of Maine

The Jumping Frenchmen of Maine were a group of 19th-century lumberjacks who exhibited a rare disorder of unknown origin. The syndrome entails an exaggerated startle reflex which may be described as an uncontrollable “jump”; individuals with this condition can exhibit sudden movements in all parts of the body.

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Prohibition of Death

Prohibition of death is a political social phenomenon and taboo in which a law is passed stating that it is illegal to die, usually specifically in a certain political division or in a specific building.

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TRIGA

TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) is a class of small nuclear reactor designed and manufactured by General Atomics. The TRIGA was developed to be a reactor that, in the words of Frederic de Hoffmann, head of General Atomics, was designed to be “safe even in the hands of a young student.”

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Ecstasy of Saint Teresa

“I saw in his hand a long spear of gold, and at the iron’s point there seemed to be a little fire. He appeared to me to be thrusting it at times into my heart, and to pierce my very entrails; when he drew it out, he seemed to draw them out also, and to leave me all on fire with a great love of God. The pain was so great, that it made me moan; and yet so surpassing was the sweetness of this excessive pain, that I could not wish to be rid of it.”

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Little Albert Experiment

The aim of Watson and Rayner was to condition a phobia in an emotionally stable child.

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Pinocchio Illusion

The Pinocchio illusion is an illusion that one’s nose is growing longer, as happened to the literary character Pinocchio when he told a lie. To experience the illusion, a vibrator is applied to the bicep tendon while one holds one’s nose with the hand of that arm.

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The Futurological Congress

“If but for a single instant you could see this world of ours the way it really is—undoctored, unadulterated, uncensored—you would drop in your tracks!”

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Paraprosdokian

“I’ve had a perfectly wonderful evening, but this wasn’t it.”

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Dreadnought Hoax

The Dreadnought hoax was a practical joke pulled by Horace de Vere Cole in 1910. Cole tricked the Royal Navy into showing their flagship, the battleship HMS Dreadnought, to a fake delegation of Abyssinian royals.

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Dakini

The dakini appeared in medieval legends in India as a demon in the train of Kali who feeds on human flesh.

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Blue Field Entoptic Phenomenon

The blue field entoptic phenomenon is the appearance of tiny bright dots (nicknamed blue-sky sprites) moving quickly along squiggly lines in the visual field, especially when looking into bright blue light such as the sky.

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School Begins

A comic panel from Puck magazine, published in 1899.

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Jevons Paradox

In economics, the Jevons paradox occurs when technological progress increases the efficiency with which a resource is used, but the rate of consumption of that resource rises because of increasing demand.

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The Cure for Insomnia

At 5,220 minutes long (87 hours, or 3 days and 15 hours) in length, the film has no plot, instead consisting of artist L. D. Groban reading his 4,080-page poem “A Cure for Insomnia” over the course of three and a half days, spliced with occasional clips from heavy metal and pornographic videos.

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Axolotl

In some cases, axolotls have been known to repair a damaged limb, as well as regenerating an additional one, ending up with an extra appendage that makes them attractive to pet owners as a novelty.

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Oliver Cromwell’s Head

Cromwell’s head remained on a spike above Westminster Hall until the late 1680s, not counting a temporary removal for roof maintenance in 1681.

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